Curse of Siberian Deafness

We Siberian Huskies are susceptible to a terrible disease that affects our ability to respond to commands at certain times – Siberian Deafness.

No, I can not hear Hu-Dad calling me.

No, I can not hear Hu-Dad calling me.

The disease is an intermittent one. For example, let’s say the Hu-Dad is calling us to come inside because he has errands to run. We might have a hard time hearing his calls. We don’t mean to be obstinate; we just can’t react to his requests.

Just wandering the yard, oblivious to Hu-Dad's calls.

Just wandering the yard, oblivious to Hu-Dad’s calls.

Some people suggest that we Siberian Huskies are willful and struggle with obeying commands. The reality is that we are perfectly willing to do whatever the human asks . . . if only we could hear them. A warm spring day seems to most interfere with our hearing ability.

Did I hear the treat jar? Siberian Deafness has been cured!

Did I hear the treat jar? Siberian Deafness has been cured!

7 Comments

  1. Mom 'n Ebby on April 11, 2017 at 5:16 am

    Mom sez: Every Siberian I’ve had (starting with Chinook, then Kiah, then Ayla, and Iceman, and now Ebby have had that same “selective hearing” problem. Ebby not nearly as bad as the others, for some reason, but it’s still there. “Come when called? Yeah, well, okay, but only if I happen to be coming that way anyway!” seems to be it.

  2. Jerry H. Owens on April 9, 2017 at 4:45 pm

    Randi says it’s called selective hearing also…and Chloe agrees …..

  3. Pat and Rebel on April 9, 2017 at 11:26 am

    Rebel also has selective hearing. But he makes it obvious that he is ignoring me because the first time I call him, he will look right at me, turn his back, sit down or walk away and totally ignore everything I say after that. I guess I am suppose to think he cannot hear me when he is walking or when his back it turned. Unfortunately, when he is like that, not even the treat jar will get his attention.

  4. Padma on April 9, 2017 at 9:32 am

    Malamutes suffer from the same affliction. Such a burden for the breeds to bear. 😉

  5. Juno's mom on April 9, 2017 at 9:22 am

    Juno has the same selective hearing issue along with the slow motion walk into the house when she finally does respond, knowing she’s being left behind. Guilt trip for us.

  6. Jane on April 9, 2017 at 7:35 am

    Oh my God isn’t that the truth. After my husky passed over the Rainbow Bridge, an employee of my husbands had a nephew who’s German Shepherd had puppies and they were ready a week after we lost Aries. What a difference in obedience. I’m mean WOW! We can let Bruce out of the fence with us and he won’t try to take off unless there is something to make him want to and all I have to do is call for him and bam, he’s right back with me. Huskies were my favorite breed of dog and still is for look wise. My favorite animal is the wolf and they are the closest to looking like one, but as a whole breed now the German Shepherd is now my favorite. Hugs and kisses to the herd.

  7. Lori on April 9, 2017 at 7:25 am

    Hmmmm…. the disease has definitely affected the Akita breed also…..

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