As The Coyote Sings

Well before sunrise, the first chirp erupted. Within minutes, the howling grew in volume. Not us this time. The coyote sings!

Frankie on coyote watch.

Frankie on coyote watch.

A pack of coyote lives in a wooded ravine just below our house. Coyotes typically only den for a couple of months every year, from the time pups are born in late March / early April until the pups are weaned in June. Once weaned, the pack sleeps in the woods for the rest of the year. The pack consists of the current year puppies, the parents, and a couple of other adults. The extra adults are usually younger adults who have not yet ventured off to form their own packs.

This time of year, coyote puppies are learning their hunting skills on very small prey (grasshoppers, insects, etc.). The pups stay hidden in the brush at the edge of fields while the adults venture into the open for the larger prey. Our field is fertile hunting ground with all of the rabbits. Parents remain close to the pups to protect them. The pack communicates with a series of chirps and howls. The singing also helps mark their territory, so they can be quite loud.

This singing and chirping is our story today.

All of that singing disturbed our sleep.

All of that singing disturbed our sleep.

At 5 a.m. Saturday morning, Hu-Dad was awakened to the sound of the coyote pack in our lower field. The chirping and singing was especially loud since they were close to the house. As we have mentioned before, we sleep inside at night – partially because of all of the wildlife in our area. So the coyote pack hunts our field at night, and we reclaim it in the morning. We were awake and listening to them with the Hu-Dad, but never spoke back to them (they speak coyote and we speak Siberian Husky).

At 6 a.m., however, Hu-Dad released us to our field (after carefully scanning it for prey and predator). Our reaction yesterday was classic – we raced to the center of the yard, gathered as a pack, and sang the song of our people. Basically, the song goes, “We are here. This is our field. So there.” The coyotes chirped back to us as they disappeared deep into the woods to sleep through the day. For the next several weeks, we will claim the field during the day, and they will hunt in it at night. (Well, unless the bobcat claims it. She always wins hunting rights).

Coyotes in my field! How dare they!

Coyotes in my field! How dare they!

In case you ask, we have seen the coyotes several time, including one youngster a couple of years ago who used to stretch out in the field and watch us play.

4 Comments

  1. Lori on July 3, 2016 at 7:44 am

    How beautiful to live in a place where you can all witness the wonders of nature!!!

  2. Zoe on July 3, 2016 at 3:50 am

    I was wondering, have you ever witnessed any long term communication between your Sibe family and the Coyote pack? Do they ever join in song? Or just speak back and forth? (Hopefully not in the middle of the night when Hu-dad is getting his beauty sleep). And with the coyote so near do they ever bother the “big dogs” that live next door?
    I have to tell you the area you live in is so amazing, thank you for sharing it with us.

    • The Thundering Herd on July 3, 2016 at 6:30 am

      The longest “communication” we have ever witnessed was not vocal, but canine body language. A young pup (about 4 months) was enamored watching us play. She would stretch out in the grass and watch – daylight and in the open field. You can see a very lousy picture of her here – https://thethunderingherd.com/2013/08/03/which-way-did-she-go/ .

      We have been known to have song contests back and forth with them, but Hu-Dad thinks that is less a conversation and more of a “This Land Is My Land” discussion.

      As for the horses and cows next door, a coyote usually prefer much smaller prey. A pack might focus on a sick or young animal, but they would need to be isolated. The horses are usually stay fairly close to each other (and the cows usually near as well). That would be a whole lot of hooves to deal with and not very inviting for a coyote. We have never witnessed a coyote approach that Herd at all.

      • Zoe on July 4, 2016 at 9:10 am

        That is so amazing thank you for sharing this peek into your life!!

Leave a Comment





Read Another Story

← Back One Story ◊ OR ◊ Forward One Story →

This Week's Thundering Herd Special Features

Monday Musing

Weekly thoughts from our Hu-Dad with the latest updates on his writing projects, the books he's reading, and a gratuitous dog photo of us.

Lowe's Two-Trip Rule

September 25, 2022

Another home improvement project proved the accuracy of the Lowe’s Two-Trip Rule and made me think of the similarity to writing.

Way Back Wednesday

Each week, we reach back into our vault of over 4,700 previous posts and share a favorite. We hope you enjoy this look back.

Games Siberians Play – Catch

July 2, 1995 |

A bored Siberian Husky can be quite creative to keep herself entertained, as Nikita did in a game of catch with a less than happy turtle.

Visit Millerton, a fictional small town near Asheville NC, via D.K. Wall's novels. Ordinary people. Extraordinary events.